Video: Wibbitz

Use: Increase engagement and exposure through a video summary version of news stories on mobile devices

Wibbitz is a new iOS-based mobile app that automatically creates a video summary of a text news article or blog post, incorporating images, graphics and text.   Wibbitz app users can select stories from a variety of categories and hear a computer-generated voice read a summary of the story while watching related images and animated infographics.

Wibbitz has reportedly partnered with 50,000 sources including AP, CNN, Yahoo!, Reuters, Huffington Post and NBC  to provide with to the site.   PaidContent reports that Wibbitz will provide publishers with its technology “at some point in the future so that they can incorporate Wibbitz’s service  into their own apps,” with the London Telegraph the first to do so next month.

Publishers may want to consider partnering with Wibbitz to gain exposure for their own content and contact Wibbitz about incorporating their technology to easily provide mobile users with a more engaging news experience.

More:

Update 11/12/13: GigaOM: Wibbitz wants to be the “play button” for text media

paidContent: Why the startup Wibbitz could wipe out some publishers’ video businesses

Readwrite: Siri Will Now Read You The News, Courtesy of Wibbitz

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Social Media: Short Videos

Facebook is taking on Twitter/Vine with a video version of Instagram.  The app will allow users to create a 15-second video (compared to 6 seconds for Vine) and will support 13 custom filters.  Users will also be able to edit video frames and add a photo at he beginning.

Meanwhile, according to CNET, Vine may be reworking their app to add new features.  Based on videos posted by Vine’s founders, the new features may include a new design, curation capabilities, private messaging and, perhaps, the ability to build Vines from previous footage. (All based on CNET’s interpretation of the videos).

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Update 8/8/13: ReadWrite: Instagram Now Lets Users—and Marketers—Post Canned Video

Update: 7/16/13: MediaPost: Honda Does Personalized Vines For Summer

Update 7/11/13: AdWeek: Instagram Debuts Video Embeds, Could Alter Publishing Habits

Update 7/04/13: All Things D: In Wake of Vid-stagram, Vine’s Latest Update Could Spur Growth

Mashable: How to Create an Instagram Video in 7 Simple Steps, 6 Reasons Instagram Video Beats Vine

Forbes: Facebook’s Video On Instagram To Challenge Twitter’s Vine

CNET: Vine videos provide clues to new design, features

TechCrunch: Vine Goes On The Offensive, Teases New Features Ahead Of Instagram Video Launch

Poynter: Instagram gives news orgs tips on using its video feature

Video: ParaShoot

Use:  “Always-on” video recording for covering news events and capturing unexpected moments

ParaShoot is a small, HD camera that hangs from the user’s neck and can be set to record video automatically and share wirelessly.  The 720p camera can record video while reporters are covering an event, picking up b-roll footage or capturing an unexpected moment if the reporter’s main camera is not currently rolling.  (Storage is limited to about an hour’s worth of video, but it does include an internal SD memory slot).  ParaShoot also offers an app that can be used to control the camera, including shooting interval and sharing.

(Another alternative, of course,  is Google Glass which will also allow you to shoot video on the fly without having to whip out and set up you mobile camera.)

The company is raising money through Kickstarter (they need to raise $260,000 by July 23) and will reserve a device for $129 to early backers.

More:

Mashable: Use ParaShoot to Capture Your Life on Video

Video: Videolicious

Use:  Increase user engagement by easily creating stories with photos or video clips on your mobile device; inexpensively provide advertisers with more compelling video messaging

Videolicious is an iOS-based app that allows you to easily put together a video or photo presentation from media on your mobile device.   You select the media elements you want to include (in the order you want them to appear) and can add narration, music, logos, etc.  The service is free for personal use, $5 per month for basic business and $10 a month for premium service.

The Washington Post used Videolicious to, among other things, quickly create a video interview the creator of a robotic vehicle at CES.  Here’s another example. Coldwell Banker agents’ use the tool to easily create narrated videos of homes.

More:

Poynter: Videolicious: One way reporters can make and file decent videos from their iPhones

TechCrunch: Videolicious Relaunches Its App For Mobile Video Editing, Raises $1.4 Million From Amazon And Others

HootSuite: Video Storytelling Using Videolicious

Video: Google Slomo

Use:  Increase user engagement through enhanced video storytelling

Google recently announced the addition of a tool that will allow anyone to convert a regular video into a slow motion video on YouTube.  You can determine if the video plays at half speed, quarter speed or eighth speed and maintains the resolution of the original video.  The tool is available through YouTube’s Video Editor.

You can see how news organizations without a lot of video resources could use this tool to help users zero in on activity in a live action video such as a high-school football game (see this example of Miami Heat highlights) or crime captured on a security camera.

More:

The Next Web: Google now lets anyone turn their YouTube upload into a slow motion video

The Verge: YouTube adds automatic slow motion tool to its video editing suite

Search Engine Watch: YouTube Slow Motion Tool Helps Turn Videos Into Epic Moments

Video: Soo Meta

Use: Increase user engagement; expose users to additional content; enhance advertiser messages

Soo Meta, which has been described as Storify for online video, allows publishers to easily mix videos with still images, text, links, music, polls, RSS feeds and other video.  It was developed by Hungarian-based DragonTape and is available as a mobile app and WordPress plugin.  Soo Meta charges a nominal monthly fee for the “professional” version of the application. A sample video on the Soo Meta site (showing the creation of life-size Lego version of a Star Wars X-Fighter) showcases the technology’s capabilities.

As online video viewing continues to explode, this type of technology will allow media company content to stand out (given the volume of other content that can be integrated). It also can help generate elusive video ad revenue by providing advertisers with more engaging messaging possibilities beyond flat video ads.

More:

paidContent: Soo Meta, the Storify for online video storytelling, launches to the public

The Next Web: Soo Meta: A new way to tell multimedia stories online that’s ideal for journalists or teachers