Content Development: Storehouse

Use:  develop stories for readers or advertisers by aggregating content from various sites and service

Storehouse is a storytelling iPad app that allows you to upload and combine content from Flickr, Instagram, your Dropbox or your iOS camera roll.  Content can include text, photos and videos.

The app provides an easy-to-use and intuitive editing tool to manipulate content elements into a cohesive story.

Other similar story creation tools covered in this blog include Videolicious, Creatavist, Soo Meta,

In addition to news or human interest stories, you can use Storehouse to develop content for advertisers, such as an aggregation of on-sale apparel at Macy’s or tours of new homes for realtors.

More:

VentureBeat: Meet Storehouse, the visual narrative app that wants to tell your story

journalism.co.uk: Journalists can use Storehouse to build media-rich stories

Sfgate: Storehouse creates game-changing visual storytelling app

 

 

 

 

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Video: Using Short Video for News

Use: Capitalize on the growing use of short videos such as Vine and Instagram to report news

Short video services Vine and Instagram have seen meteoric growth this past year.  Instagram’s mobile app grew 66 percent (the most of any app in 2013) and now 31.9 million active monthly unique users (out of total user base of 150 million worldwide). Nearly 180,000 Instagram videos have been shared on Twitter.  Vine, meanwhile, has north of 40 million registered users and one research study reported that five Vine videos are shared every second on Twitter. (Facebook owns Instagram and Twitter owns Vine.)

This rapid growth and integration into media consumption behavior (particularly for younger generations), suggests that news organizations should be experimenting with short video to reach those audience segments.  And many are.   Following are some resources, including tips and examples,  to help you think about your short video strategy.

Storyful: Instagram’s accidental foray into news video

All Things D: All the News That Fits in a 15-Second Segment: NowThisNews Tries Instagram, and the Results Are Pretty Interesting

ABC News: What Instagram Video Means for News Coverage

Instagram Blog:  News on Instagram

RJI: Futures Lab update #37: Apps and tips for mobile reporting

Mediashift: How Journalists Can Use Vine

Poynter: Newsrooms use Vine to show personality, process, previews in 6-second videos

Business Insider: How Media Outlets Are Using Vine To Deliver The News — Some Better Than Others

Video: JumpCam

Use:  Easily combine video snippets from multiple locations into one seamless video

In an earlier blog post, I featured an app called Crowdflik that allows you to aggregate video clips from various shooters at the same event. JumpCam is a similar concept but allows videographers at different locations (and different times) to collaborate on a single video and edit it in real-time.  Using the free app, a user can shoot up to a 10-second video and then invite others to add their clips to the same video (for up to 30 clips).  Users can arrange the clips in any order, add music, etc.

Publishers can use JumpCam to create a single video from reporters covering different aspects of the same story.  For example, reporters can be spread out over a town capturing perspectives on a new city ordinance and integrate them into one video.  Or students covering simultaneous football games at different locations could provide quick game summaries that can be combined into one movie.

More:

TechCrunch: JumpCam, Backed With $2.7M, Debuts Its Snappy Mobile App For Making Collaborative Videos

Time:  JumpCam Is a Video Sharing Network That’s Collaborative as Well as Social

The Verge: JumpCam for iPhone wants you to crowdsource your video with friends

 

Video: Spreecast

Use:  Provide users with access to real-time virtual conversations with reporters, thought leaders, newsmakers, etc.

Spreecast is a “social video” platform that allows users to view real-time, streaming conversations between up to four people.  Publishers can organize conversations, interviews, etc. with newsmakers through Webcams and broadcast that to viewers through Spreecast’s platform.  Video conversations can be shared on social media platforms and are archived for later viewing.

From TechCrunchUp to 4 people at a time can be face-to-face, streaming their conversation live while hundreds of others can watch, chat, and participate by submitting comments and questions to those on-screen. Viewers can also request to join on camera, while producers of the Spreecast can manage the action. Spreecast is also integrated with Facebook, Twitter, and Google+ so that producers and creators can broadcast their conversations to their friends, followers, circles, contacts and connections. Once live-streamed, Spreecasts are recorded and then made immediately available for playback and sharing. The platform is browser-based and built on Flash. By default, Spreecasts are public and designed to be social but users can also create private Spreecasts as well.

More:

PCMag.com: Q&A: StubHub Founder Mixes Social Media, Video, Celebs on Spreecast

TechCrunch: Social Video Startup Spreecast Launches An iPhone App And Mobile Web Streaming For iOS And Android

Video: Crowdflik

Use:  Find and integrate user-created videos from the same event

Crowdflik is a free app that allows users to shoot video of events and find and edit other videos shot with CrowdFlik from the same event.  According to the developer, “CrowdFlik uses the naval atomic clock to accurately time stamp video with 1/10th of a second accuracy. Once video is captured and saved, it is stored in the cloud and recognized by the app in 10 second clips on the event timeline. When a user taps their favorite video clips from an event, CrowdFlik is then able to pull the different event footage from the cloud and synchronize it precisely.”

Although developed initially for use at concerts, weddings, parties, etc., you can imagine news organizations aggregating different video perspectives from the same news event and editing into one package.  Of course, that requires that other witnesses are using the Crowdflik app as well.

More

TechCrunch: CrowdFlik’s Auto-Synced, Crowdsourced Footage Lets Anyone Become A Documentary Filmmaker

Yahoo Small Business Adviser: CrowdFlik: Crowdsource Your Visual Content Marketing

Video: MixBit

Use:  Create low-cost video presentations by linking together and editing various video snippets

MixBit is a new video app from the founders of YouTube that allows publishers to stitch together and edit video snippets using the MixBit app.  So, for example, if a publisher is covering a local political campaign, the reporter can shoot up to 256, 16-second clips (candidates speech, reactions from supporters/detractors, crowd shots, etc.) and then easily edit them together into coherent video presentation.  The video can then be shared through MixBit and other social media platforms.

Publishers could also use the tool to create native advertising video for advertisers, for example taking clips of various do-it-yourself projects sponsored by a local (or Big Box) hardware store.

More:

TechCrunch: YouTube Founders Introduce MixBit To Crack The Code Of Video Editing On Mobile

The Verge: YouTube founders remix Vine and Instagram with Mixbit for iOS

Digital Trends: MixBit App Review: From the makers of YouTube comes the newest video-sharing app

Related Apps for Media Posts:

Video and Audio Editing Apps

Videolicious

Soo Meta

 

 

Content Development: Zeega

Use:  Create multimedia mash-ups to tell stories for users or advertisers in new, engaging ways

Zeega allows users to tell stories with a variety of multimedia elements, some curated by Zeega and some supplied by the users themselves.  Users drag various media onto slides, insert text, choose music to play behind the images and share the final product (essentially a slide show) through Facebook, Twitter or Tumblr.  Zeega curates media from SoundCloub, Tumblr, Flickr and Giphy (and provides appropriate attribution).

You can view samples Zeegas here.

Publishers can use Zeega tools to tell interesting stories in new, compelling ways.  They can also use the tool to create new, engaging advertising units (in the form of slideshows).

More:

Mashable: Zeega Offers a New Way to Tell Stories With Interactive Media

GigaOM: Amping up the GIF: Zeega wants to re-invent interactive media on mobile

i-Docs: The Zeega revolution: remake the Internet!