Video: Videolicious

Use:  Increase user engagement by easily creating stories with photos or video clips on your mobile device; inexpensively provide advertisers with more compelling video messaging

Videolicious is an iOS-based app that allows you to easily put together a video or photo presentation from media on your mobile device.   You select the media elements you want to include (in the order you want them to appear) and can add narration, music, logos, etc.  The service is free for personal use, $5 per month for basic business and $10 a month for premium service.

The Washington Post used Videolicious to, among other things, quickly create a video interview the creator of a robotic vehicle at CES.  Here’s another example. Coldwell Banker agents’ use the tool to easily create narrated videos of homes.

More:

Poynter: Videolicious: One way reporters can make and file decent videos from their iPhones

TechCrunch: Videolicious Relaunches Its App For Mobile Video Editing, Raises $1.4 Million From Amazon And Others

HootSuite: Video Storytelling Using Videolicious

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Video: Google Slomo

Use:  Increase user engagement through enhanced video storytelling

Google recently announced the addition of a tool that will allow anyone to convert a regular video into a slow motion video on YouTube.  You can determine if the video plays at half speed, quarter speed or eighth speed and maintains the resolution of the original video.  The tool is available through YouTube’s Video Editor.

You can see how news organizations without a lot of video resources could use this tool to help users zero in on activity in a live action video such as a high-school football game (see this example of Miami Heat highlights) or crime captured on a security camera.

More:

The Next Web: Google now lets anyone turn their YouTube upload into a slow motion video

The Verge: YouTube adds automatic slow motion tool to its video editing suite

Search Engine Watch: YouTube Slow Motion Tool Helps Turn Videos Into Epic Moments

Roundup: Tools for Writers and Journalists

Following are links to several columns with recommendations for various apps and tools to help journalists and writers navigate digital content creation, curation and sharing.

Five types of content curation tools for journalists

A list of 10 curation tools which journalists can use to collect multimedia content from across the web, organized by type.

“For those of us with a tight budget, little tech know-how, and even less time, there is still hope for adding multimedia into your communications plans. In not much time at all, you can produce a powerful photo slideshow or video with some fairly simple tools.”

Top 5 Apps for Authors

“Authors these days are more than authors. We must not only write, but edit, organize, blog, friend, tweet, connect, converse, advise, reciprocate, share and share again. These five apps (and I mean “apps” beyond the mobile-only kind) help me streamline these tasks so that I can spend more time actually writing and sell more books.”

10 digital tools journalists can use to improve their reporting, storytelling

“Digital tools help produce quality content online, but it can be tough figuring out where to start. Here are 10 online tools that can help improve journalists’ reporting and storytelling, and engage readers in multimedia.”

New Digital Tools for Journalists: 10 to Learn

“I asked Knight’s Michael Maness and the Journalism and Media Innovation team what tools journalists should be learning. In time, the tool tutorials will get to all of them. Here’s Maness’ list.”

Content Development: Creatavist

Use:  Easily develop new, multimedia products to increase user engagement and create new advertising inventory

Creatavist, from long-form content site Atavist, allows publishers to easily integrate text, audio, video and other interactive elements into an e-book or other large content package and instantly publish it across apps, e-book platforms and the Web.  Creatavist (still in Beta) is a cloud-based platform and requires no expertise to create multimedia content.

Creatavist joins other multimedia content publishing tool developers such as Vook and Apple’s iBooks Author, to help media companies re-purpose and monetize existing content or create new product lines and revenue streams.  Vook, at one time, was promoting their own self-publishing tool but it now appears that they have retreated to their original service of creating and distributing books for you.  iBooks Author does allow for self-publishing but only to the iTunes store.

Creatavist users include The Wall Street Journal, The Paris Review and TED.

More:

CU-Boulder: Innovative Digital Storytelling for News

Book Business: Future Think: Atavist

Daniel Dalton: In Praise of Creatavist