Roundup: Tips and Tools for Writers and Journalists, Part 2

Following is an aggregation of stories with tips and tools for journalists and writers.  Part 1 is located here.

Journalism.co.uk: 6 lessons from BuzzFeed as it launches in the UK

Streetfight: 7 Strategies for Generating Localized News Stories

Social Media Examiner: 3 Tools to Help You Discover and Share Great Content

Storyful: Facebook for news: maximising the effectiveness of Facebook newsgathering

Journalism.co.uk: 16 online tools for newsgathering

Journalism.co.uk: 20 search tips and tools for journalists

Mashable: 13 Best Free Audio Editors

Journalism.co.uk: Journalist launches iPad app for logging video interviews

PaidContent: Check out Slate’s cool tool for better Twitter headlines

Journalism.co.uk: Twenty Tumblr tips for news outlets

API: 10 tips for understanding your audiences and targeting new ones

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Content Development: Zeega

Use:  Create multimedia mash-ups to tell stories for users or advertisers in new, engaging ways

Zeega allows users to tell stories with a variety of multimedia elements, some curated by Zeega and some supplied by the users themselves.  Users drag various media onto slides, insert text, choose music to play behind the images and share the final product (essentially a slide show) through Facebook, Twitter or Tumblr.  Zeega curates media from SoundCloub, Tumblr, Flickr and Giphy (and provides appropriate attribution).

You can view samples Zeegas here.

Publishers can use Zeega tools to tell interesting stories in new, compelling ways.  They can also use the tool to create new, engaging advertising units (in the form of slideshows).

More:

Mashable: Zeega Offers a New Way to Tell Stories With Interactive Media

GigaOM: Amping up the GIF: Zeega wants to re-invent interactive media on mobile

i-Docs: The Zeega revolution: remake the Internet!

 

 

Video: ifussss

Use:  Get access to user-provided breaking-news video

ifussss, which stands for “if you see something, share something,” is a platform for accessing user-generated breaking new video.  The app, which will be available for iOS and Android on September 9, allows users to record and share 30-second clips (metadata will be added automatically).  The platform will filter and clear the rights to each video.

Publishers can monitor and search content on ifussss and download clips for a “small fee”, part of which will go to the original videographer.

Other crowdsourced video platforms include Newsflare and Demotix.

More:

Mediabistro: ifussss: New Video Sharing App and Newsroom for Journos

Journalism.co.uk: New user-generated video app to launch

Content Development: POP App

Use:  Easily create rough iPhone app prototypes

POP App allows publishers to sketch out app prototypes on paper (or online), upload photos of the sketches and then animate the action to see a rough version of the app in action.   After sketching and uploading photos of a storyboard, users can create “link spots” within the app to simulate the user interface.  Transition effects include basic, next, back, rise and dismiss.   You can then share the prototype with others to try out on their iOS device or Web browser (Android versions are in the works).

More:

The Next Web: Here are our 5 favorite companies from 500 Startups’ sixth batch demo day

CultofMac: Ingenious Pop App Lets You Design Apps On Paper [Review]

 

 

 

 

Content Development: Scoopshot

Use:  Engage the community to provide photos for stories or events; increase engagement for advertisers with customers and prospects

Scoopshot is a “crowdsourced” photography platform that connects photographers (amateur and professional) with media companies.   Publishers can create a “task” on Scoopshot and ask Scoopshot users to submit photos related to that task.  For example, if a newspaper wanted photographs from a July 4th parade, they can create that task on Scoopshot and hope that local photographers respond (publishers can identify how many potential Scoopshot photographers reside in a particular location).

All photos cost $5 (of which the photographer gets half) and can be bought by anyone (not just the task creator).  Publishers can create tasks for free but pay extra for things like mobile app alerts, including a logo or a task banner and extending the timeframe for the task.

Publishers benefit by getting access to photos of events they may not be able to cover (but our valued by the community) and creating deeper relationships with community members.  They could also use the service to increase engagement for advertisers, for example asking Scoopshot members to submit photographs of dresses they covet from Macy’s or their meals from Olive Garden that could be included in advertiser ads.

More:

Update 7/30/13: Journalism.co.uk: New user-generated video app to launch

Update 7/25/13:  Journalism.co.uk: Journalist launches PicFair as image licence marketplace

Update 7/22/13: VentureBeat: CrowdMedia sells everyone’s newsworthy Twitter pics — and could just change journalism forever

The Next Web: Scoopshot scoops $1.2m from top-selling stock photographer, and opens its crowdsourced image site to all

Gigaom: Taking stock: EyeEm and Scoopshot attack stock photo industry from different angles

Poynter: New Guardian, Scoopshot efforts bring elements of automation to photo verification

Content Development: Locu

Use:  Provide extensive information about local businesses to users; add to digital marketing services products for local advertisers.

Locu provides a platform and central database for merchants to provide updated menus and service lists.  The database contains more than 1 million listings which were created originally by Locu staff.  Local merchants can claim those pages and provide their own updates.  Locu also can distribute the content directly to a merchants site or Facebook page or to partner sites such as Yelp, TripAdvisor and Foursquare.

Publishers need not cede local merchant listings and reviews to Yelp and other social directories.  With the Locu API, they can tap into the huge database of merchant info to build their own directory and then upsell enhancements to merchants.  Even though Locu provides the capability for merchants themselves to update once, distribute to many; local media companies can use the power of their traditional products to offer even more value to those merchants.

More:

Update 7/19/13: All Things D: Apple Acquires Local Data Outfit Locationary

All Things D: How Locu Became Every Local Business’s Personal Publisher

TechCrunch: Yelp Partners With Locu, Allowing Businesses To Post Menus, Daily Specials & Photos To Yelp In Real Time

StreetFight: A Year After Big Scores by SinglePlatform and Yext, Locu Makes a Quiet Push

Content Development: Prss

Use:  Create compelling iPad “magazines” with easy-to-use tools

Prss is an app that allows non-technical users to create magazine-like publications that use the iPad’s native interactive capabilities.  The app, which is now in beta and is scheduled to be publicly released at the end of the summer, uses the iPad’s interface — swiping, tapping, pinching, etc. — instead of menus to create multimedia and shareable magazines.  The product also dramatically reduces file sizes for speedier streaming from the cloud.

The Netherlands-based company used the technology to create TRVL, the iPad’s most-downloaded travel publication.  Their current business model is to offer the app for free and charge a small fee per download.

Publishers who want to offer iPad users a more compelling, native experience with inexpensive and intuitive creation tools, should explore this application.

More:

Update 10/7/13: The Next Web: Prss is a powerful new way to create professional-quality iPad magazines in your browser

Gigaom: Prss is trying to design the iPad publishing app that Apple never built

Paidcontent: PRSS aims to be a low-cost iPad magazine factory in the cloud