Content Development: POP App

Use:  Easily create rough iPhone app prototypes

POP App allows publishers to sketch out app prototypes on paper (or online), upload photos of the sketches and then animate the action to see a rough version of the app in action.   After sketching and uploading photos of a storyboard, users can create “link spots” within the app to simulate the user interface.  Transition effects include basic, next, back, rise and dismiss.   You can then share the prototype with others to try out on their iOS device or Web browser (Android versions are in the works).

More:

The Next Web: Here are our 5 favorite companies from 500 Startups’ sixth batch demo day

CultofMac: Ingenious Pop App Lets You Design Apps On Paper [Review]

 

 

 

 

Content Development: Scoopshot

Use:  Engage the community to provide photos for stories or events; increase engagement for advertisers with customers and prospects

Scoopshot is a “crowdsourced” photography platform that connects photographers (amateur and professional) with media companies.   Publishers can create a “task” on Scoopshot and ask Scoopshot users to submit photos related to that task.  For example, if a newspaper wanted photographs from a July 4th parade, they can create that task on Scoopshot and hope that local photographers respond (publishers can identify how many potential Scoopshot photographers reside in a particular location).

All photos cost $5 (of which the photographer gets half) and can be bought by anyone (not just the task creator).  Publishers can create tasks for free but pay extra for things like mobile app alerts, including a logo or a task banner and extending the timeframe for the task.

Publishers benefit by getting access to photos of events they may not be able to cover (but our valued by the community) and creating deeper relationships with community members.  They could also use the service to increase engagement for advertisers, for example asking Scoopshot members to submit photographs of dresses they covet from Macy’s or their meals from Olive Garden that could be included in advertiser ads.

More:

Update 7/30/13: Journalism.co.uk: New user-generated video app to launch

Update 7/25/13:  Journalism.co.uk: Journalist launches PicFair as image licence marketplace

Update 7/22/13: VentureBeat: CrowdMedia sells everyone’s newsworthy Twitter pics — and could just change journalism forever

The Next Web: Scoopshot scoops $1.2m from top-selling stock photographer, and opens its crowdsourced image site to all

Gigaom: Taking stock: EyeEm and Scoopshot attack stock photo industry from different angles

Poynter: New Guardian, Scoopshot efforts bring elements of automation to photo verification

Content Development: Locu

Use:  Provide extensive information about local businesses to users; add to digital marketing services products for local advertisers.

Locu provides a platform and central database for merchants to provide updated menus and service lists.  The database contains more than 1 million listings which were created originally by Locu staff.  Local merchants can claim those pages and provide their own updates.  Locu also can distribute the content directly to a merchants site or Facebook page or to partner sites such as Yelp, TripAdvisor and Foursquare.

Publishers need not cede local merchant listings and reviews to Yelp and other social directories.  With the Locu API, they can tap into the huge database of merchant info to build their own directory and then upsell enhancements to merchants.  Even though Locu provides the capability for merchants themselves to update once, distribute to many; local media companies can use the power of their traditional products to offer even more value to those merchants.

More:

Update 7/19/13: All Things D: Apple Acquires Local Data Outfit Locationary

All Things D: How Locu Became Every Local Business’s Personal Publisher

TechCrunch: Yelp Partners With Locu, Allowing Businesses To Post Menus, Daily Specials & Photos To Yelp In Real Time

StreetFight: A Year After Big Scores by SinglePlatform and Yext, Locu Makes a Quiet Push

Content Development: Prss

Use:  Create compelling iPad “magazines” with easy-to-use tools

Prss is an app that allows non-technical users to create magazine-like publications that use the iPad’s native interactive capabilities.  The app, which is now in beta and is scheduled to be publicly released at the end of the summer, uses the iPad’s interface — swiping, tapping, pinching, etc. — instead of menus to create multimedia and shareable magazines.  The product also dramatically reduces file sizes for speedier streaming from the cloud.

The Netherlands-based company used the technology to create TRVL, the iPad’s most-downloaded travel publication.  Their current business model is to offer the app for free and charge a small fee per download.

Publishers who want to offer iPad users a more compelling, native experience with inexpensive and intuitive creation tools, should explore this application.

More:

Update 10/7/13: The Next Web: Prss is a powerful new way to create professional-quality iPad magazines in your browser

Gigaom: Prss is trying to design the iPad publishing app that Apple never built

Paidcontent: PRSS aims to be a low-cost iPad magazine factory in the cloud

Video: Wibbitz

Use: Increase engagement and exposure through a video summary version of news stories on mobile devices

Wibbitz is a new iOS-based mobile app that automatically creates a video summary of a text news article or blog post, incorporating images, graphics and text.   Wibbitz app users can select stories from a variety of categories and hear a computer-generated voice read a summary of the story while watching related images and animated infographics.

Wibbitz has reportedly partnered with 50,000 sources including AP, CNN, Yahoo!, Reuters, Huffington Post and NBC  to provide with to the site.   PaidContent reports that Wibbitz will provide publishers with its technology “at some point in the future so that they can incorporate Wibbitz’s service  into their own apps,” with the London Telegraph the first to do so next month.

Publishers may want to consider partnering with Wibbitz to gain exposure for their own content and contact Wibbitz about incorporating their technology to easily provide mobile users with a more engaging news experience.

More:

Update 11/12/13: GigaOM: Wibbitz wants to be the “play button” for text media

paidContent: Why the startup Wibbitz could wipe out some publishers’ video businesses

Readwrite: Siri Will Now Read You The News, Courtesy of Wibbitz

Social Media: Short Videos

Facebook is taking on Twitter/Vine with a video version of Instagram.  The app will allow users to create a 15-second video (compared to 6 seconds for Vine) and will support 13 custom filters.  Users will also be able to edit video frames and add a photo at he beginning.

Meanwhile, according to CNET, Vine may be reworking their app to add new features.  Based on videos posted by Vine’s founders, the new features may include a new design, curation capabilities, private messaging and, perhaps, the ability to build Vines from previous footage. (All based on CNET’s interpretation of the videos).

More:

Update 8/8/13: ReadWrite: Instagram Now Lets Users—and Marketers—Post Canned Video

Update: 7/16/13: MediaPost: Honda Does Personalized Vines For Summer

Update 7/11/13: AdWeek: Instagram Debuts Video Embeds, Could Alter Publishing Habits

Update 7/04/13: All Things D: In Wake of Vid-stagram, Vine’s Latest Update Could Spur Growth

Mashable: How to Create an Instagram Video in 7 Simple Steps, 6 Reasons Instagram Video Beats Vine

Forbes: Facebook’s Video On Instagram To Challenge Twitter’s Vine

CNET: Vine videos provide clues to new design, features

TechCrunch: Vine Goes On The Offensive, Teases New Features Ahead Of Instagram Video Launch

Poynter: Instagram gives news orgs tips on using its video feature

Content Development: Socl Network Tools

Use:  Easily create content to increase user engagement or advertiser value

Socl is a social network from Microsoft’s Future Social Experiences (FUSE) Labs that offers a variety of tools that media companies can use to create compelling new content to share.  Tools include:

Collage, which allows users to drag and drop a collection of images and automatically create a stylish page that can be posted on social networks.  One obvious use is to gather a collection of photos from today’s newspaper, broadcast or Web site and use the page to promote the site.   You could also use the tool to gather a variety of images from an advertiser’s inventory to help them promote daily specials.

Video Party, provides a platform to tell a story with a series of video clips.  On the site, you create a title for your “party” (for example, “Turkey Rebellion”) and the service searches for relevant videos which are displayed in queue.  You click on the videos in the order you want to create a playlist which can be shared with friends.  You can modify the search to find additional relevant videos, as well.

Other tools include Blink, a “Vine-link” application for Windows’ OS that allow users to layer photos and video to create a short, shareable clip, and Picotale, a tool to create clever memes by typing in a headline and having the service search for interesting, matching images.

More:

YouTube: Socl Create Experiences

GeekWire: Microsoft updates ‘Socl’ network with new photo and video creation tools

PCWorld: Microsoft’s Socl network steps up its game with animated GIFs, meme generator

 

 

Content Development: SoundCite

Use:  increase user engagement with in-line audio on content; provide quick audio bites to include in advertising

SoundCite, a product of Knight Lab, allows content developers to integrate easily and seamlessly short audio snippets — such as clips from speeches, songs, interviews, etc. —   directly into story text.  Users would simply click on text to play the clip rather than move to a separate audio player. SoundCite also could be used to imbed  short audio (jingle? sound effect?) in advertising content.

The tool, now in beta, is open-source and available on GitHub.

More:

Knight Lab: SoundCite beta, in-line audio tool, ready to use

Content Development: Vizify

Use:  Increased engagement by making users feel more connected to staff; branding tool for advertisers

Vizify is a free tool that creates slide show biographies based on your social media activity.  The easy-to-use tool assembles tweets, LinkedIn profile data, Facebook activity and Foursquare activity to automatically create a video slide show.  You can also add “Vizcards” (sort of a personal infographic), quotes, factoids and photos. The presentation can be easily edited before making live.  Mine — created in about 90 seconds — is here.

A new feature creates an actual video based on your Twitter activity, including tweets, photos and video.  Mine was too boring to show here.

Media companies could use the tool to help better connect users to personalities (reporters, broadcasters, etc.) or as part of a backgrounder for people in the news (provided they have created a Vizify video).  Because the data assembled is all from publicly available sources, perhaps Vizify someday will allow media to build videos of third-parties.   I can also envision using the tool as an added branding vehicle for advertisers.

More:

The Next Web: Vizify joins forces with Twitter, now you can create an instant ‘movie trailer’ bio in no time at all

TechCrunch: Visual Identity Platform Vizify Launches Out Of Beta, Now Lets You Share Graphics Via Social Media Cards

GeekWire: Show your quirky side: Vizify unveils new bite-sized infographics just about you

Content Development: Screensiz.es

Use:  Streamline process to develop apps across mobile devices or responsive design layouts.

Screensiz.es provides a database of information about smartphone, tablet, laptop and desktop screen sizes sortable by operating system,  physical size, pixel dimension , resolution, pixel density and device popularity.  The database lists data for 28 smartphones, 25 tablets and 23 desktop devices.

screensizes

More:

The Next Web: Simplify your responsive design workflow with Screensiz.es, a database of mobile and desktop specs